Recent News at Kluge-Ruhe

Celebrate NAIDOC Week July 7 - 14! • Monday July 1, 2013

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee, and its origins can be traced to the emergence of Aboriginal groups in the 1920s which sought to increase awareness in the wider community of the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians. NAIDOC Week is an annual week-long celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and an opportunity to recognize the contributions of Indigenous Australians in various fields.

In recognition and celebration, the Kluge-Ruhe Collection will fly the Aboriginal flag for the duration of the week and is offering free, public programs.

SPONSORED BY THE EMBASSY OF AUSTRALIA

Guided Tour with Professor Howard Morphy
Sunday, July 7, 1:00 pm

To kick off NAIDOC Week, Professor Howard Morphy will give a free guided tour of the museum’s current exhibitions. Dr. Morphy is the Director of the Research School of Humanities and the Arts at Australian National University and has served as advisor to the Kluge-Ruhe Collection since 1995. He is the author of several books including Ancestral Connections: Art and an Aboriginal System of Knowledge (University of Chicago Press), Aboriginal Art (Phaidon) and, with Marcus Banks, Rethinking Visual Anthropology (Yale University Press).

Reception with Master Printer Michael Kempson and Curator Tess Allas
Friday, July 12, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

Join the Kluge-Ruhe Collection in celebrating the exhibition Black Prints from Cicada Press over wine and hors d’oeuvres. Michael Kempson, Director and Master Printer at Cicada Press, and Tess Allas, lecturer at the College of Fine Arts at the University of New South Wales, will be present to discuss the exhibition and the importance of NAIDOC week for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal Flag Printmaking Workshop
Saturday, July 13, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Make your own Aboriginal flag! In this family workshop, learn about the printmaking process from Michael Kempson and the significance of the Aboriginal flag from Tess Allas. Each participant will leave with their own print of the flag.

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